Teaching Democratic Thinking (2009-2011)

  • Bloch-Shulman, Stephen, and Maggie Castor. 2015. “I Am Not Trying to Be Defiant, I Am Trying to Be Your Partner: How to Help Students Navigate Educational Institutions That Do Not Value Democratic Practice.” Partnerships: A Journal of Service-Learning and Civic Engagement 6 (1): 161-180.

  • Bloch-Shulman, Stephen, J. F. Humphrey, Spoma Jovanovic, and Hollyce Giles. 2015. “What Kind of Community? An Inquiry into Teaching Practices that Move beyond Exclusion.” Partnerships: A Journal of Service-Learning and Civic Engagement 6 (1): 25-50.

  • Bloch-Shulman, Stephen, Donna Engelmann, and Maggie Castor. 2010. “Teaching Democratic Thinking.” Presentation at American Association of Philosophy Teachers Biennial Conference, Myrtle Beach, SC 2010.

  • Bloch-Shulman, Stephen, Elizabeth Minnich, Donna Engelmann, Mark Cubberley, and Ed Whitfield. 2010. “Teaching Democratic Thinking.” Presentation at Association of American Colleges and Universities Annual Meeting, Washington, DC 2010.

  • Bloch-Shulman, Stephen. 2010. “When the ‘Best Hope’ Is Not So Hopeful, What Then?: Democratic Thinking, Democratic Pedagogies, and Higher Education.” The Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (4): 399–415.

  • Bloch-Shulman, Stephen, Elizabeth Minnich, Ed Whitfield, Desirae Simmons, Wesley Morris, Michele Leaman, Spoma Jovanovic, Kathleen Edwards, and Maggie Castor. 2012. “Teaching Democratic Thinking.” Presentation at Association of American Colleges and Universities Annual Meeting, Washington, DC 2012.

  • Bloch-Shulman, Stephen, Maggie Castor, and Jessie L. Moore. 2011. “Exploring Radical Research.” Presentation at International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Milwaukee, WI 2011.

  • Bringle, Robert, Patti Clayton, and Kathryn E. Bringle. 2015. “From Teaching Democratic Thinking to Developing Democratic Civic Identity.” Partnerships: A Journal of Service-Learning and Civic Engagement 6 (1): 51-76.

  • Jovanovic, Spoma, Mark Congdon Jr, Crawford Miller, and Garrett Richardson. 2015. “Rooting the Study of Communication Activism in an Attempted Book Ban.” Partnerships: A Journal of Service-Learning and Civic Engagement 6 (1): 115-135.

  • Moore, Jessie L. 2013. “Preparing Advocates: Service-Learning in TESOL for Future Mainstream Educators.” TESOL Journal 4 (3). https://doi.org/10.1002/tesj.97.

Critical Transitions: Writing and the Question of Transfer (2011-2013)

  • Adler-Kassner, Linda, and Elizabeth Wardle, eds. 2015. Naming what we know: Threshold concepts of writing studies. Boulder, CO: Utah State UP.

    About this Edited Book:

    Contributors define thirty-seven threshold concepts in the discipline of writing studies and examine the application of threshold concepts in specific sites of writing.

  • Adler-Kassner, Linda. 2014. “Liberal Learning, Professional Training, and Disciplinarity in the Age of Educational ‘Reform’: Remodeling General Education.” College English 76.5: 436-457.

  • Adler-Kassner, Linda, John Majewski, and Damian Koshnick. 2012. “The Value of Troublesome Knowledge: Transfer and Threshold Concepts in Writing and History.” Composition Forum 26. http://compositionforum.com/issue/26/troublesome-knowledge-threshold.php.

  • Adler-Kassner, Linda, and John Majewski. 2012. “Current Contexts: Students, Their Instructors, and Threshold Concepts.” Presentation at Conference on College Composition and Communication, St. Louis, MO 2012.

  • Adler-Kassner, Linda. 2017. “Transfer and educational reform in the twenty-first century: College and career readiness and the Common Core Standards.” In Understanding writing transfer: Implications for transformative student learning in higher education, edited by Jessie L. Moore and Randall Bass, 15-26. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

  • Anson, Chris A., and Jessie L. Moore, eds. 2016/2017. Critical Transitions: Writing and the Question of Transfer. Fort Collins, CO: The WAC Clearinghouse and University Press of Colorado.

  • Anson, Chris. 2012. “Current Research on Writing Transfer.” Presentation at National Council of Teachers of English Conference, Las Vegas, NV 2012.

  • Anson, Chris M. 2016. “The Pop Warner Chronicles: A Case Study in Contextual Adaptation and the Transfer of Writing Ability.” College Composition and Communication 67 (4): 518-549.

  • Barnett, Brooke, Woody Pelton, Francois Masuka, Kevin Morrison, and Jessie L. Moore. 2017. “Diversity, global citizenship, and writing transfer.” In Understanding writing transfer: Implications for transformative student learning in higher education, edited by Jessie L. Moore and Randall Bass, 59-68. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

  • Blythe, Stuart. 2012. “Prompting Student Reflection Through Audio-video Journals.” Presentation at Conference on College Composition and Communication, Computer Connect Session, St. Louis, MO, March 2012.

  • Boone, Stephanie, Sara Biggs Chaney, Josh Compton, Cristiane Donahue, and Karen Gocsik. 2012. “Imagining a Writing and Rhetoric Program Based on Principles of Knowledge ‘Transfer’: Dartmouth’s Institute for Writing and Rhetoric.” Composition Forum 26. http://compositionforum.com/issue/26/dartmouth.php.

  • Boyd, Diane E. 2014. “Bottleneck Behaviours and Student Identities: Helping Novice Writers Develop in the First Year Seminar and Beyond.” Presentation at Threshold Concepts in Practice, Durham, UK 2014.

  • Boyd, Diane E. 2017. “Student drafting behaviors in and beyond the first-year seminar.” In Understanding writing transfer: Implications for transformative student learning in higher education, edited by Jessie L. Moore and Randall Bass, 103-112. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

  • Clark, Irene. 2014. “Fostering Transfer Across Writing Contexts: Genre Awareness as a Threshold Concept.” Presentation at 12th International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference, Minneapolis, MN, July 12, 2014.

  • Clark, Irene. 2012. “Students’ Awareness of Genre and Rhetoric.” Presentation at National Council of Teachers of English Conference, Las Vegas, NV, November 16, 2012.

  • Clark, Irene. 2012. “Academic Writing and Transferability: Print and New Media.” Presentation at Council of Writing Program Administrators Conference, Albuquerque, NM, July 2012.

  • Clark, Irene. 2012. “Rhetorical Knowledge and Genre Awareness as Gateway to Transfer.” Presentation at Conference on College Composition and Communication, St. Louis, MO, March 2012.

  • Clark, Irene, and Andrea Hernandez. 2011. “Genre Awareness, Academic Argument, and Transferability.” The WAC Journal 22: 65-78. https://wac.colostate.edu/journal/vol22/clark.pdf.

  • DasBender, Gita. 2012. “Reflective Writing and Knowledge Transfer of Multilingual Students.” Presentation at New Jersey College English Association (NJCEA) Conference, South Orange, NJ, April 14, 2012.

  • DasBender, Gita. 2012. “Explicit Teaching, Mindful Learning: Writing Knowledge and Skills Transfer of Multilingual Students in First-Year Writing.” Presentation at Conference on College Composition and Communication, St. Louis, MO, March 24, 2012.

  • Donahue, Christiane. 2014. “WAC, International Research, and ‘Transfer’: Waves of Troublesome Knowledge.” Presentation at 12th International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference, Minneapolis, MN, June 12, 2014.

  • Driscoll, Dana L. 2014. “Clashing Values: A Longitudinal, Exploratory Study of Student Beliefs about General Education, Vocationalism, and Transfer of Learning.” Teaching & Learning Inquiry 2 (1): 21-37. http://tlijournal.com/tli/index.php/TLI/article/view/67/66.

  • Driscoll, Dana, Ed Jones, Carol Hayes, and Gwen Gorzelsky. 2013. “Promoting Transfer through Reflection: A Cross-Institutional Study of Metacognition, Identity, and Rhetoric.” Presentation at Conference on College Composition and Communication, Las Vegas, NV, March 16, 2013.

  • Driscoll, Dana L., and Jennifer H. M. Wells. 2012. “Beyond Knowledge and Skills: Writing Transfer and the Role of Student Dispositions in and beyond the Writing Classroom.” Composition Forum 26. http://compositionforum.com/issue/26/beyond-knowledge-skills.php.

  • Farrell, Alison, and Sharon Tighe-Mooney. 2015. “Recall, Recognise, Re-Invent: The Value of Facilitating Writing Transfer in the Writing Centre Setting.” Journal of Academic Writing 5 (2): 29-42.

  • Farrell, Alison, Sandra Kane, Steven P. Salchak, and Cecilia M. Dube. 2015. “Empowered empathetic encounters: Building international collaborations through researching writing in the context of South African higher education and beyond.” South African Journal of Higher Education 29 (4): 96-113.

  • Farrell, Alison, Sandra Kane, Cecilia Dube, and Steve Salchak. 2017. “Rethinking the role of higher education in college preparedness and success from the perspective of writing transfer.” In Understanding writing transfer: Implications for transformative student learning in higher education, edited by Jessie L. Moore and Randall Bass, 81-92. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

  • Felten, Peter. 2017. “Writing high-impact practices: Developing proactive knowledge in complex contexts.” In Understanding writing transfer: Implications for transformative student learning in higher education, edited by Jessie L. Moore and Randall Bass, 49-58. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

  • Goldschmidt, Mary. 2014. “Teaching Writing in the Disciplines: Student Perspectives on Learning Genre.” Teaching & Learning Inquiry 2 (2): 25-40. http://tlijournal.com/tli/index.php/TLI/article/view/66/37.

  • Goldschmidt, Mary. 2017. “Promoting cross-disciplinary transfer: A case study in genre learning.” In Understanding writing transfer: Implications for transformative student learning in higher education, edited by Jessie L. Moore and Randall Bass, 122-130. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

  • Gorzelsky, Gwen, Carol Hayes, Ed Jones, and Dana Lynn Driscoll. 2017. “Cueing and adapting first-year writing knowledge: Support for transfer into disciplinary writing.” In Understanding writing transfer: Implications for transformative student learning in higher education, edited by Jessie L. Moore and Randall Bass, 113-121. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

  • Hillard, Van E. 2012. “Intellectual Ethos as Transcendent Disposition.” Presentation at South Atlantic Modern Language Association, Durham, NC, November 11, 2012.

  • Kane, Sandra, and Cecilia Dube. 2012. “Perspectives from a South African University on Students’ Writing Apprehension, Attitudes to Writing and Performance.” Presentation at International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference, Savannah, GA, June 9, 2012.

  • Kupatadze, Ketevan. 2012. “The Role of Students’ Attitudes Towards Foreign Language Writing and the Problems and Opportunities of Transfer.” Presentation at South Atlantic Modern Language Association, Durham, NC, November 11, 2012.

  • Kupatadze, Ketevan, and Scott Chien-Hsiung Chiu. 2014. “Supporting Second/Foreign Language Writing in Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Academic Environments.” Presentation at 12th International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference, Minneapolis, MN, June 14, 2014.

  • Moore, Jessie L., and Randall Bass, eds. 2017. Understanding Writing Transfer: Implications for Transformative Student Learning in Higher Education. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing.

  • Moore, Jessie L. 2014. “The Elon Statement on Writing Transfer and its Implications for WAC.” Presentation at 12th International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference, Minneapolis, MN, June 13, 2014.

  • Moore, Jessie L. 2012. “Mapping the Questions: The State of Writing-Related Transfer Research.” Composition Forum 26. http://compositionforum.com/issue/26/map-questions-transfer-research.php.

  • Moore, Jessie L. 2012. “Connecting Teacher-Scholars: Igniting Multi-Institutional Research through a Research Seminar.” Presentation at National Council of Teachers of English Conference, Las Vegas, NV, November 16, 2012.

  • Moore, Jessie L. 2012. “A 20×20 Introduction to Writing Transfer Research.” Presentation at South Atlantic Modern Language Association, Durham, NC, November 11, 2012.

  • Moore, Jessie L. 2012. “Connecting Localities with Multi-Institutional Research.” Presentation at Council of Writing Program Administrators Conference, Albuquerque, NM, July 20, 2012.

  • Moore, Jessie L. 2017. “Five essential principles about writing transfer.” In Understanding writing transfer: Implications for transformative student learning in higher education, edited by Jessie L. Moore and Randall Bass, 1-12. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

  • Moore, Jessie L., and Chris M. Anson. 2016/2017. “Introduction.” In Critical transitions: Writing and the question of transfer, edited by Chris M. Anson and Jessie L. Moore, 3-13. Fort Collins, CO: The WAC Clearinghouse and University Press of Colorado.

  • Qualley, Donna, Justin Ericksen, Leon Erickson, Samuel Johnson, LeAnne Laux-Bachand, Michelle Magnero, and Aimee Odens. 2013. “(Re)Aligning Expectations: Graduate Student Teachers as Agents of Integration.” Presentation at Conference on College Composition and Communication, Las Vegas, NV, March 2013.

  • Robertson, Liane, Kathleen Blake Yancey, and Kara Taczak. 2014. “Shifting Currents in Writing Instruction: Prior Knowledge and Transfer across the Curriculum.” Presentation at 12th International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference, Minneapolis, MN, June 14, 2014.

  • Robertson, Liane. 2012. “Connecting Content and Transfer in Teaching Writing across Contexts.” Presentation at South Atlantic Modern Language Association, Durham, NC, November 11, 2012.

  • Robertson, Liane, and Kara Taczak. 2017. “Teaching for transfer.” In Understanding writing transfer: Implications for transformative student learning in higher education, edited by Jessie L. Moore and Randall Bass, 93-102. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

  • Taczak, Kara. 2012. “The Question of Transfer.” Composition Forum 26. http://compositionforum.com/issue/26/question-of-transfer.php.

  • Taczak, Kara. 2012. “The Transfer of Transfer: Moving across Institutional Contexts.” Presentation at South Atlantic Modern Language Association, Durham, NC, November 11, 2012.

  • Wardle ., Elizabeth. 2012. “Creative Repurposing for Expansive Learning: Considering ‘Problem-Exploring’ and ‘Answer-Getting’ Dispositions in Individuals and Fields.” Composition Forum 26.

  • Wardle, Elizabeth, and Nicolette Mercer Clement. 2017. “”The hardest thing with writing is not getting enough instruction”: Helping educators guide students through writing challenges.” In Understanding writing transfer: Implications for transformative student learning in higher education, edited by Jessie L. Moore and Randall Bass, 131-143. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

  • Wells, Jennifer, Ed Jones, and Dana Driscoll. 2012. “Opening Gateways Across the Curriculum: Writing about Writing and Transfer in High School and College Courses.” Presentation at Conference on College Composition and Communication, St. Louis, MO, March 22, 2012.

  • Werder, Carmen. 2013. “Misaligned Expectations: How They Work as Agents of Disintegration.” Presentation at Conference on College Composition and Communication, Las Vegas, NV, March 16, 2013.

  • Werder, Carmen M. 2017. “Telling expectations about academic writing: If not working, what about knotworking?” In Understanding writing transfer: Implications for transformative student learning in higher education, edited by Jessie L. Moore and Randall Bass, 69-78. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

  • Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte, Stacey Cozart, Tine Wirenfeldt Jensen, and Gry Sandholm Jensen. 2013. “Grappling with identity issues: Danish graduate student views on writing in L2 English.” Presentation at The English in Europe (EiE) conference on the English language in teaching in European higher education, Copenhagen, DK, April 19-21, 2013.

  • Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte, Stacey Cozart, Tine Wirenfeldt Jensen, and Gry Sandholm Jensen. 2012. “Writing in English is like being married to somebody you don’t know very well: Postgraduate writing in L2 English.” Presentation at The NIC Conference on Intercultural Communication, Aarhus, DK 2012.

  • Yancey, Kathleen, Liane Robertson, and Kara Taczak. 2014. Writing Across Contexts: Transfer, Composition, and Sites of Writing. Logan, UT: Utah State University Press.

    About this Book:

    In Writing across Contexts, Yancey, Robertson, and Taczak draw from studies of transfer, reflective practice, and learning more broadly as they examine the role of curriculum in promoting (or not promoting) students’ transfer of writing knowledge and practices from first-year composition (FYC) to future writing contexts. They compared an expressivist approach, a media and culture theme, and the Teaching for Transfer design for teaching FYC by interviewing faculty, analyzing course materials and students’ writing, and interviewing students both during the semester they were enrolled in FYC and in the subsequent semester.

    In brief, students in the expressivist FYC course seemingly drew from prior (high school) experiences with writing, but they did not tap their FYC course content when they wrote for future courses. Similarly, students in the media and culture themed FYC drew on models and process strategies in subsequent writing contexts, since they had not developed rhetorical analysis strategies or writing theories in FYC to guide their examination of and responses to future writing situations. Yancey, Robertson, and Taczak write:

    Without discernible content, students fill in their own content; without a theory on which to build and apply knowledge, Carolina turned to models and Darren turned to process. In cases like this – when content or theory is absent or indiscernible, and especially when it is perceived to be at odds with writing in other university sites – models of writing become the teacher and the curriculum…. Too much “floating” content – content unmoored to specific writing theory or practice – resulted in a lack of cohesion, a common thread absent throughout the course design that students could discern or use as a guide or passport. (pp. 87-88)

    In other words, regardless of how good a teacher might be, if the FYC curriculum doesn’t supply students with writing-relevant content and with a theory for organizing that content as it relates to understanding and responding to varied writing contexts, students are unlikely to apply their FYC experience to writing in subsequent courses and extracurricular contexts.

    In the Teaching for Transfer (TFT) design, students learn key terms central to analyzing, practicing, and theorizing writing (e.g., genre, audience, rhetorical situation, etc.) and develop their own theories of writing. Reflection also plays a key role in students’ theory-building processes. While not all students in the TFT FYC course in Yancey, Robertson, and Taczak’s study engaged in mindful transfer from FYC to their subsequent writing contexts, two of the three case study students “kept building their theory of writing, then, connecting key terms and concepts to one another and layering in new concepts as they learned them” and “they became increasingly sophisticated at articulating and practicing their theory of writing” (p. 99). The curriculum’s grounding in writing’s key terms helped students build ways of thinking about and practices for engaging with future writing contexts.

    Writing across Contexts offers a helpful framework for discussing how a FYC curriculum grounded in writing content can help students assemble and remix writing knowledge in ways that promote transfer to other writing contexts. Additionally, the authors share sample course policies and syllabi, major assignments, and semester schedules for the Teaching for Transfer design in the book’s appendices.

  • Yancey, Kathleen Blake. 2017. “Writing, transfer, and ePortfolios: A possible trifecta in supporting student learning.” In Understanding writing transfer: Implications for transformative student learning in higher education, edited by Jessie L. Moore and Randall Bass, 39-48. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research (2014-2016)

  • Amin, S., Andrea Hunt, Michael Neal, Ruth Palmer, Christin Scholz, and Brad Wuetherick. 2014. “Mentoring of undergraduate research and identity development.” Presentation at Pre-ISSOTL CUR Symposium, Quebec City, Canada, October 22, 2014.

  • Baker, Vicki L., Jane Greer, Laura G. Lunsford, Dijana Ihas, and Meghan J. Pifer. 2018. “Supporting Faculty Development for Mentoring in Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work.” In Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research, edited by Maureen Vandermaas-Peeler, Paul C. Miller and Jessie L. Moore, 131-153. Washington, D.C.: Council on Undergraduate Research.

  • Baker, Vicki L., Meghan J. Pifer, Laura G. Lunsford, Jane Greer, and Dijana Ihas. 2015. “Faculty as mentors in undergraduate research, scholarship, and creative work: Motivating and inhibiting factors. .” Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning. http://10.1080/13611267.2015.1126164.

  • Davis, Shannon N., Duhita Mahatmya, Pamela W. Garner, and Rebecca M. Jones. 2015. “Mentoring undergraduate scholars: A pathway to interdisciplinary research?” Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning DOI: 10.1080/13611267.2015.1126166.

  • Garnder, Pamela W., Duhita Mahatmya, Rebecca M. Jones, and Shannon N. Davis. 2018. “Undergraduate Research Mentoring Relationships: A Mechanism for Developing Social Capital for Underrepresented Students.” In Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research, edited by Maureen Vandermaas-Peeler, Paul C. Miller and Jessie L. Moore, 77-103. Washington, D.C.: Council on Undergraduate Research.

  • Hill, Jennifer, and Helen Walkington. 2016. “Developing Graduate Attributes through Participation in Undergraduate Research Conferences.” Journal of Geography in Higher Education 40 (2): 222-237. https://doi.org/10.1080/03098265.2016.1140128.

    About this Journal Article:

    This article examines students’ experiences at a national undergraduate research conference in an effort to understand the development of graduate attributes, which are the framework of skills, attitudes, values and knowledge that graduates ought to have developed by the end of their degrees. The research takes a largely qualitative approach, using semi-structured interviews to collect data. The authors explain that research on graduate attributes is relevant because there is a growing, international conversation about the purpose and characteristics of higher education, and that it is becoming ever more important for institutions to justify their social roles to students. This article focuses on a case study of 22 Geography, Earth and Environmental Science (GEES) graduates, and forms part of a larger study on interdisciplinary graduate attributes. Additionally, the authors split the attributes they analyzed into five categories: communication; research and inquiry skills; personal and intellectual autonomy; ethical, social, and professional understanding; and information literacy. Notably, the authors found that the conference provided a safe and supportive, while also challenging, context for students to develop these skills. This research highlights the importance of opportunities to develop such skills outside of formal disciplinary curricula.

  • Hill, Jennifer, Helen Walkington, and Derek France. 2016. “Graduate attributes: implications for higher education practice and policy.” Journal of Geography in Higher Education 40 (2): 155-163. https://doi.org/10.1080/03098265.2016.1154932.

    About this Journal Article:

    This article offers an overview of existing higher education literature on and attitudes towards the development of graduate attributes, while introducing the papers which comprised a symposium on this research context. One issue the authors discuss is the extent of the connection between what academic staff set up for students in terms of skill development and how much students actually experience. The authors also note the importance of students accepting agency in the process of developing their own graduate attributes, rather than letting the system determine their identities. In their conclusion, the authors emphasize that regardless of inconsistencies in teaching and assessing graduate attributes, they play a valuable role in enhancing learning and connecting learning to work beyond students’ academic careers.

  • Johnson, W. Brad. 2018. “Foreword.” In Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research, edited by Maureen Vandermaas-Peeler, Paul C. Miller and Jessie L. Moore, ix-xii. Washington, D.C.: Council on Undergraduate Research.

  • Johnson, Brad W., Laura L. Behling, Paul C. Miller, and Maureen Vandermaas-Peeler. 2015. “Undergraduate research mentoring: Obstacles and opportunities.” Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning DOI: 10.1080/13611267.2015.1126167.

  • Ketcham, Caroline J., Eric E. Hall, Heather M. Fitz Gibbon, and Helen Walkington. 2018. “Co-Mentoring in Undergraduate Research: A Faculty Development Perspective.” In Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research, edited by Maureen Vandermaas-Peeler, Paul C. Miller and Jessie L. Moore, 155-179. Washington, D.C.: Council on Undergraduate Research.

  • Ketcham, Caroline J., Eric E. Hall, and Paul C. Miller. 2017. “Co-Mentoring Undergraduate Research: Student, Faculty and Institutional Perspectives.” Perspectives on Undergraduate Research and Mentoring 6 (1). http://blogs.elon.edu/purm/files/2017/10/final_Ketcham-Hall-Miller_main.pdf.

    About this Journal Article:

    This article outlines the benefits and challenges of co-mentoring for students, faculty mentors, and institutions. The authors themselves have several years of experience co-mentoring undergraduate research projects, and offer insights they have gained through those projects. The authors present the co-mentoring model they have developed and a practical guide to co-mentoring, incorporating salient practices of mentoring undergraduate research. In their conclusion, the authors note that a lot of work needs to happen to foster co-mentoring relationships, but if that happens, they can be extremely beneficial to all involved parties.

  • Kneale, Pauline, Andrew Edwards-Jones, Helen Walkington, and Jennifer Hill. 2016. “Evaluating undergraduate research conferences as vehicles for novice researcher development.” International Journal for Researcher Development 7 (2): 159-177. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJRD-10-2015-0026.

    About this Journal Article:

    This paper assesses the significance of participation in undergraduate research conferences on students’ attitudes and professional development, including the development of graduate attributes. The paper positions the undergraduate research conference as an authentic learning context using the theory of situated learning. The authors interviewed 90 undergraduate students at research conferences, and analyzed their responses using the Researcher Development Framework. Students reported that paper presentations, poster presentations, and the overall conference experience were particularly valuable to their skill development. Two of these skills were public engagement and communication, which the authors note are routinely sought after by employers. The authors also offered some suggestions to conference organizers in order to maximize skill development, including providing dedicated networking time within the program.

  • Lunsford, Laura, Meghan Pifer, Vicki Baker, Jane Greer, and Dijana Ihas. 2015. “Who are Faculty Mentors of Undergraduate Research, Scholarly, or Creative Works?” Presentation at Annual meeting of the International Mentoring Association, Phoenix, AZ, April 2015.

  • Moore, Jessie L. 2018. “Afterword.” In Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research, edited by Maureen Vandermaas-Peeler, Paul C. Miller and Jessie L. Moore, 215-219. Washington, D.C.: Council on Undergraduate Research.

  • Nicholson, Brittany A., Meagan Pollock, Caroline J. Ketcham, Heather M. Fitz Gibbon, Evan D. Bradley, and Michelle Bata. 2017. “Beyond the Mentor-Mentee Model: A Case for Multi-Mentoring in Undergraduate Research.” Perspectives on Undergraduate Research and Mentoring 6 (1). http://blogs.elon.edu/purm/files/2017/10/Nicholson_et_al_6.1.pdf.

    About this Journal Article:

    In this paper, the authors argue that multi-mentoring can be applied in a global, interdisciplinary context to undergraduate research, and make the case for moving beyond the traditional one-to-one model as the default for inquiry into undergraduate research practices. The paper includes descriptions of relevant multi-mentoring and co-mentoring models, and offers suggestions for implementing multi- and co-mentoring practices to advance the undergraduate experience. In their conclusion, the authors note that institutions will need to assist faculty mentors in overcoming some of the challenges that accompany starting out with multi-mentoring.

  • Palmer, Ruth J, Andrea N Hunt, Michael R Neal, and Brad Wuetherick. 2018. “Mentored Undergraduate Research: An Investigation into Students’ Perceptions of Its Impact on Identity Development.” In Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research, edited by Maureen Vandermaas-Peeler, Paul C. Miller and Jessie L. Moore, 19-42. Washington, D.C.: Council on Undergraduate Research.

  • Palmer, Ruth J., Andrea N. Hunt, Michael Neal, and Brad Wuetherick. 2015. “Mentoring, undergraduate research, and identity development: A conceptual review and research agenda.” Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning DOI: 10.1080/13611267.2015.1126165.

  • Partridge, Lee, Kathy Takayama, Candace Rypisi, and Cassandra Horii. 2014. “Preparing future faculty for undergraduate research mentoring: A multi-institutional study.” Presentation at Pre-ISSOTL CUR Symposium, Quebec City, Canada, October 22, 2014.

  • Shanahan, Jenny Olin. 2018. “Mentoring Strategies that Support Underrepresented Students in Undergraduate Research.” In Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research, edited by Maureen Vandermaas-Peeler, Paul C. Miller and Jessie L. Moore, 43-75. Washington, D.C.: Council on Undergraduate Research.

  • Shanahan, Jenny Olin, Helen Walkington, Elizabeth Ackley, Eric E. Hall, and Kearsley A. Stewart. 2017. “Award-Winning Mentors See Democratization as the Future of Undergraduate Research.” CUR Quarterly 37 (4): 4-11. https://doi.org/10.18833/curq/37/4/14.

    About this Journal Article:

    In this article, the authors set out to identify likely future trends for undergraduate research (UR) in the next five to ten years. This research is important for the field because it can help faculty and administrators consider how they plan to allocate resources to ensure equitable and high-quality UR mentoring in the future. The authors conducted a literature review and interviews with faculty who have won awards for their commitment to and expertise of UR. Their two main findings are as follows. First, UR will likely see greater democratization in terms of greater access to opportunities for students from historically-underserved groups, students from nontraditional populations, and students with average academic performance histories. And second, mentor-mentee relationships are expected to strengthen across national and international borders as online communication capacities continue to advance. Curricula redesigns that incorporate inquiry-based learning may also facilitate greater participation in UR.

  • Shanahan, Jenny O., Elizabeth Ackley-Holbrook, Eric Hall, Kearsley Stewart, and Helen Walkington. 2015. “Ten salient practices of undergraduate research mentors: A review of the literature.” Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning DOI: 10.1080/13611267.2015.1126162.

  • Vandermaas-Peeler, Maureen, Paul C. Miller, and Jessie L. Moore. 2018. “Introduction: Considering Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research in Context.” In Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research, edited by Maureen Vandermas-Peeler, Paul C. Miller and Jessie L. Moore, 1-18. Washington, D.C.: Council on Undergraduate Research.

  • Vandermaas-Peeler, Maureen, Paul C. Miller, and Jessie L. Moore. 2018. Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research. Washington, D.C.: Council on Undergraduate Research.

    About this Book:

    This edited collection features multi-institutional and international research from the 2014-2016 Center for Engaged Learning research seminar on Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research.

  • Vandermaas-Peeler, Maureen, Pault C. Miller, and Tim Peeples. 2015. “‘Mentoring is sharing the excitement of discovery’: Faculty perceptions of undergraduate research mentoring.” Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning DOI: 10.1080/13611267.2015.1126163.

  • Walkington, Helen, Eric E. Hall, Jenny Olin Shanahan, Elizabeth Ackley, and Kearsley Stewart. 2018. “Striving for Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research: The Challenges and Approaches to Salient Practices.” In Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research, edited by Maureen Vandermaas-Peeler, Paul C. Miller and Jessie L. Moore, 105-129. Washington, D.C.: Council on Undergraduate Research.

  • Walkington, Helen, Jennifer Hill, and Pauline E. Kneale. 2016. “Reciprocal elucidation: a student-led pedagogy in multidisciplinary undergraduate research conferences.” Higher Education Research and Development 36 (2): 416-429. https://doi.org/10.1080/07294360.2016.1208155.

    About this Journal Article:

    This article investigates the benefits of attending a multidisciplinary research conference as an undergraduate researcher, focusing on student voices and self-perceptions of learning and skill development. The authors conducted 90 interviews with student conference participants over the course of three years, and found that the opportunity to present research in a setting outside of institutional or disciplinary contexts bolstered student researchers’ development of skills and confidence. The authors frame the undergraduate research conference as a threshold experience for self-authorship development, and thus such conferences are much more than just a space to present research findings. They also found that students who presented at conferences often reported a sense of unfinishedness, which challenges academics to consider ways to bring comparable experiences into the classroom, to provide space for students to develop knowledge through reciprocal dialogue.

  • Walkington, Helen. 2015. Students as researchers: Supporting undergraduate research in the disciplines in higher education. York, UK: Higher Education Academy.

  • Wuetherick, Brad, John Willison, and Jenny Olin Shanahan. 2018. “Mentored Undergraduate Research at Scale: Undergraduate Research in the Curriculum and as Pedagogy.” In Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research, edited by Maureen Vandermaas-Peeler, Paul C. Miller and Jessie L. Moore, 181-202. Washington, D.C.: Council on Undergraduate Research.

Integrating Global Learning with the University Experience: Higher-Impact Study Abroad and Off-Campus Domestic Study (2015-2017)

  • Berdrow, Iris, Rebecca Cruise, Ekaterina Levintova, Sabine Smith, Laura Boudon, Dan Paracka, and Paul M. Worley. 2020. “Exploring Patterns of Student Global Learning Choices: A Multi-Institutional Study.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, Stylus.

    About this Book Chapter:

    A combination of institutional and individual factors matter in making choices to pursue study away. A holistic approach to global learning including both classroom and co-curricular opportunities is superior to efforts only to increase study abroad numbers. These holistic approaches can benefit both students who do study abroad and those who do not.

  • Deardorff, Darla K., and Dawn Michele Whitehead. 2020. “Expanding the Perceptions and Realities of Global Learning: Connecting Disciplines Through Integrative Global Learning and Assessment.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, Stylus.

    About this Book Chapter:

    This chapter provides a broad perspective on assessing global learning. Whitehead and Deardorff suggest having input on assessment from a variety of sources including students, educators, administrators, and staff and designing holistic models of assessment that extend beyond the learner’s college or university years.

  • Drake Gobbo, Linda, and Joseph G. Hoff. 2020. “Approaching Internationalization as an Ecosystem.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, Stylus.

    About this Book Chapter:

    A Global Learning Ecosystem comprises administrative, curricular, and co-curricular efforts within a college or university. Internationalization, including enrolling international students who join in creating global learning for themselves and for students who do not leave campus, is a useful way of considering global learning. Faculty and staff development and attention to programming across the ecosystem can enhance global learning both on and off campus.

  • Holgate, Horane, Heidi E. Parker, and Charles A. Calahan. 2020. “Assessing Global Competency Development in Diverse Learning Environments.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, Stylus.

    About this Book Chapter:

    This chapter presents three short scales assessing civic engagement, intercultural knowledge and intercultural competence, all based on AAC&U VALUE rubrics. These scales, which are free to access and use, are suitable for assessing a variety of global learning contexts.

  • Layne, Prudence, Sarah Glasco, Joan Gillespie, Dana Gross, and Lisa Jasinski. 2020. “#FacultyMatter: Faculty Support and Interventions Integrated into Global Learning.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, Stylus.

    About this Book Chapter:

    Like their students, faculty are also global learners. As such, scholars need to investigate the impact of teaching in disorienting settings on faculty and that colleges and universities need to provide professional development in pedagogy appropriate to these contexts and to facilitate opportunities for faculty to reflect on and process the experiences.

  • Levintova, Ekaterina, Sabine Smith, Rebecca Cruise, Iris Berdrow, Laura Boudon, Dan Paracka, and Paul M. Worley. 2020. “Have Interest, Will NOT Travel: Unexpected Reasons Why Students Opt Out of International Study.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, Stylus.

    About this Book Chapter:

    Some factors like military experience, family responsibilities, health concerns, and being a student athlete can preclude international study for some students. Universities can help students integrate previous experiences like military deployment or international family travel with other high-impact practices like internships and service-learning. They can also ameliorate some of the scheduling and responsibility concerns for students who do want to travel for study.

  • Manning, Scott, Zachary Frieders, and Lynette Bikos. 2020. “When Does Global Learning Begin? Recognizing the Value of Student Experiences Prior to Study Away.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, Stylus.

    About this Book Chapter:

    When you ask students to describe valuable experiences in preparing for study away, previous travel and encounters with diversity matter and should be considered when developing pre-departure experiences. Institutions and instructors can use a strengths-based focus to help students to transfer what they have learned from previous domestic and international experiences.

  • Moore, Jessie L. 2020. “Epilogue: Global Learning as High-Quality Engaged Learning.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, 189-194. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

  • Namaste, Nina, and Amanda Sturgill. 2020. “Introduction.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, Stylus.

    About this Book Chapter:

    Key issues in understanding study away today include: the artificial silos between international and domestic off-campus study and the need to understand study away in the context of the changing world of higher education in general. In particular, study away is no longer the extended time abroad that has been the focus of earlier studies. This volume explores factors related to students, faculty and programs that provide off-campus learning at home and abroad.

  • Namaste, Nina B. 2017. “Designing and Evaluating Students’ Transformative Learning.” The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 8 (3). http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/cjsotl_rcacea/vol8/iss3/5/.

  • Namaste, Nina, and Amanda Sturgill. 2020. “Opportunities and Challenges of Ethical, Effective Global Learning.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, Stylus.

    About this Book Chapter:

    Quality study away needs to address a set of ethical imperatives including rejecting colonialist models in favor of seeking reciprocity, using high-quality research findings to maximize learning from both domestic and international off-campus experiences, and intentionally integrating both kinds of study away with the larger college and university experience.

  • Paras, Andrea, and Lynne Mitchell. 2020. “Up for the Challenge? The Role of Disorientation and Dissonance in Intercultural Learning.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, Stylus.

    About this Book Chapter:

    Experiences of cognitive dissonance can help explain shifts in development of intercultural competence. Quality global learning experiences should embrace opportunities to encounter and be made uncomfortable by difference and encourage students to recognize dissonance when it occurs.

  • Rathburn, Melanie, Jodi Malmgren, Ashley Brenner, Michael Carignan, Jane Hardy, and Andrea Paras. 2020. “Assessing Intercultural Competence in Student Writing: A Multi-Institutional Study.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, Stylus.

    About this Book Chapter:

    When working with short-term, faculty-led programs, written reflective writing and opportunities for working with local communities enhance global learning. Service-learning, which can be done in both international and domestic contexts, causes greater shifts in perspective and enhanced demonstration of ability to adapt behavior and manage emotions in different contexts.

  • Sturgill, Amanda. 2020. “Crossing Borders at Home: The Promise of Global Learning Close to Campus.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, Stylus.

    About this Book Chapter:

    Learners don’t have to cross geopolitical borders to be global learners, which is good news for students whose degree plans, life factors, or finances preclude international travel. This chapter explores some of the types of global learning possible without even leaving the town, offering results that suggest that quality domestic off-campus study CAN produce change towards intercultural competency.

  • Vandermaas-Peeler, Maureen, Joan Ruelle, and Tim Peeples. 2020. “Mapping Understandings of Global Engagement.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, Stylus.

    About this Book Chapter:

    To define global engagement requires “intentional integration of three critical foundational domains: learning/knowledge, skills/behaviors, and attitudes/dispositions.” Under this definition, global engagement occurs in both international and domestic contexts as students have mentored off- and on-campus experiences.

  • Vercamer, Bert, Linda Stuart, and Hazar Yildrim. 2020. “Global Competence Development: Blended Learning within a Constructivist Paradigm.” In Mind the Gap: Global Learning at Home and Abroad, edited by Nina Namaste and Amanda Sturgill, Stylus.

    About this Book Chapter:

    This chapter examines the use of an online preparatory curriculum for study abroad that mixes informative materials, peer learning, and cultural mentoring. The authors find that this type of curriculum improves both culture-specific and culture-general learning.

Residential Learning Communities as a High-Impact Practice (2017-2019)

  • Benjamin, Mimi, Jody Jessup-Anger, Shannon Lundeen, and Cara Lucia. 2020. “Notes for this Special Issue.” Learning Communities Research and Practice (LCRP) 8 (1). https://washingtoncenter.evergreen.edu/lcrpjournal/vol8/iss1/1.

  • Eidum, Jennifer, Lara Lomicka, Ghada Endick, Warren Chiang, and Jill Stratton. 2020. “Thriving in Residential Learning Communities.” Learning Communities Research and Practice (LCRP) 8 (7). https://washingtoncenter.evergreen.edu/lcrpjournal/vol8/iss1/7.

  • Gebauer, Richie, Mary Ellen Wade, Tina Muller, Samantha Kramer, Margaret Leary, and John Sopper. 2020. “Unique Strategies to Foster Integrative Learning in Residential Learning Communities.” Learning Communities Research and Practice (LCRP) 8 (9). https://washingtoncenter.evergreen.edu/lcrpjournal/vol8/iss1/9.

  • Leibowitz, Justin B., Charity Fiene Lovitt, and Craig S. Seager. 2020. “Development and Validation of a Survey to Assess Belonging, Academic Engagement, and Self-Efficacy in STEM RLCs.” Learning Communities Research and Practice (LCRP) 8 (3). https://washingtoncenter.evergreen.edu/lcrpjournal/vol8/iss1/3.

  • Lomicka, Lara, Warren Chiang, Jennifer Eidum, Ghada Endick, and Jill Stratton. 2019. “Thriving in Residential Learning communities: The Role of Faculty Involvement.” Poster at Residential Learning Communities as a High-Impact Practice Conference, Elon, NC 2019.

  • Lomicka, Lara, Warren Chiang, Jennifer Eidum, Ghada Endick, and Jill Stratton. 2019. “Thriving in Residential Learning Communities: An investigation of student characteristics and RLC types.” Paper at Residential Learning Communities as a High-Impact Practice Conference, Elon, NC 2019.

  • Lomicka, Lara, Warren Chiang, Jennifer Eidum, Ghada Endick, and Jill Stratton. 2019. “What Components Contribute to Thriving in Residential Learning Communities?” Paper at First Year Experience Conference, Las Vegas, NV 2019.

  • Lomicka, Lara, and Jennifer Eidum. 2019. “Pathways to Thriving.” Talking Stick November + December. http://read.nxtbook.com/acuhoi/talking_stick/november_december_2019/pathways_to_thriving.html.

  • Sriram, Rishi, Joseph Cheatle, Christopher P. Marquart, Joseph L. Murray, and Susan D. Weintraub. 2020. “The Development and Validation of an Instrument Measuring Academic, Social, and Deeper Life Interactions.” Journal of College Student Development 61 (2): 240-45. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/752979.

  • Sriram, Rishi, Cliff Haynes, Susan D. Weintraub, Joseph Cheatle, Christopher P. Marquart, and Joseph L. Murray. 2020. “Student Demographics and Experiences of Deeper Life Interactions within Residential Learning Communities.” Learning Communities Research and Practice (LCRP) 8 (8). https://washingtoncenter.evergreen.edu/lcrpjournal/vol8/iss1/8.

Capstone Experiences (2018-2020)

  • Laye, Matthew J., Caroline Boswell, Morgan Gresham, Dawn Smith-Sherwood, and Olivia S. Anderson. 2020. “Multi-Institutional Survey of Faculty Experiences Teaching Capstones.” College Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1080/87567555.2020.1786663.

  • Vale, Julie, Karen Gordon, Russell Kirkscey, and Jennifer Hill. 2020. “Student and Faculty Perceptions of Capstone Purposes: What Can Engineering Learn From Other Disciplines?” Proceedings 2020 Canadian Engineering Education Association CEEA-ACEG20. https://doi.org/10.24908/pceea.vi0.14149.