60-Second SoTL – Episode 1

This week’s episode explores how syllabus design can impact students’ motivation and their perceptions of the course and instructor. The episode features two recent publications from the open-access International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning:

  • Kaur, Angel W. 2021. “‘Dope Syllabus’: Student Impressions of an Infographic-Style Visual Syllabus.” International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 15 (2): Article 6. https://doi.org/10.20429/ijsotl.2021.150206
  • Merchán Tamayo, Jully Paola, Meredith Rocchi, Jenepher Lennox Terrion, and Simon Beaudry. 2022 “First Impressions Matter! An Experiment Comparing Autonomous and Controlling Language in Course Syllabi.” International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 16 (2): Article 7. https://doi.org/10.20429/ijsotl.2022.160207

View a transcript of this episode.

The episode was hosted by Jessie L. Moore, Director of the Center for Engaged Learning and Professor of Professional Writing & Rhetoric. 60-Second SoTL is produced by the Center for Engaged Learning at Elon University.

Read More about Designing Learner-Centered Syllabi

  • Gurung, Regan A. R., and Noelle R. Galardi. 2022. “Syllabus Tone, More Than Mental Health Statements, Influence Intentions to Seek Help.” Teaching of Psychology 49 (3): 218–223. https://doi.org/10.1177/0098628321994632
  • Harnish, Richard J., and K. Robert Bridges. 2011. “Effect of Syllabus Tone: Students’ Perceptions of Instructor and Course. Social Psychology of Education 14 (3): 319–330. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11218-011-9152-4
  • Howton, Amy, Mandy McGrew, Liyuan Liu, Lauren L. Staples, and Herman E. Ray. 2020. “The Influence of Syllabus Tone on Student Engagement in a Wellness Course.” Journal of Effective Teaching in Higher Education 3 (1). https://doi.org/10.36021/jethe.v3i1.25 [Open Access]
  • Jenkins, Jade S., Ashley D. Bugeja, and Larissa K. Barber. 2014. “More Content or More Policy? A Closer Look at Syllabus Detail, Instructor Gender, and Perceptions of Instructor Effectiveness.” College Teaching 62 (4): 129-135. https://doi.org/10.1080/87567555.2014.935700
  • Lightner, Robin, and Ruth Benander. 2018. “First Impressions: Student and Faculty Feedback on Four Styles of Syllabi.” International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 30 (3): 443-453. https://www.isetl.org/ijtlhe/pdf/IJTLHE3074.pdf [Open Access]
  • Ludy, Mary-Jon, Tim Brackenbury, John Wm Folkins, Susan H. Peet, Stephen J. Langendorfer, and Kari Beining. 2016. “Student Impressions of Syllabus Design: Engaging Versus Contractual Syllabus.” International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 10 (2): Article 6. https://doi.org/10.20429/ijsotl.2016.100206 [Open Access]
  • Nusbaum, Amy T., Samantha Swindell, and Anna Plemons. 2021. “Kindness at First Sight: The Role of Syllabi in Impression Formation.” Teaching of Psychology 48 (2): 130–143. https://doi.org/10.1177/0098628320959953
  • Stowell, Jeffrey R., William E. Addison, and Samuel L. Clay. 2018. “Effects of Classroom Technology Policies on Students’ Perceptions of Instructors: What is Your Syllabus Saying about You?” College Teaching 66 (2): 98-103. https://doi.org/10.1080/87567555.2018.1437533
  • Wheeler, Lindsay B., Michael Palmer, and Itiya Aneece. 2019. “Students’ Perceptions of Course Syllabi: The Role of Syllabi in Motivating Students.” International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 13 (3): Article 7. https://doi.org/10.20429/ijsotl.2019.130307 [Open Access]
  • Young-Jones, Adena, Chantal Levesque, Sophie Fursa, and Jason McCain. 2021. “Autonomy-supportive Language in the Syllabus: Supporting Students from the First Day.” Teaching in Higher Education 26 (4): 541-556. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1661375

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