Students writing collaboratively in a computer classroom

Digital Literacies in Writing-Intensive Courses

by Jessie L. Moore Writing-Intensive Courses – one of the high-impact practices identified by George Kuh (2008; see also AAC&U’s High-Impact Educational Practices) – can and should be attentive to the evolving nature of writing. Writing in the 21st Century…

undergraduate research defined

International Perspectives on Undergraduate Research and Inquiry

How do international teacher-scholars define undergraduate research and inquiry? We asked participants in the Center’s research seminar on Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research to share their definitions: httpvh://youtu.be/XTx6G_M-z5k Many of our seminar scholars begin with the Council on Undergraduate Research…

A team of interactive media students arrive on location in Costa Rica

Study Abroad and Pre-Professional Programs

by Amanda Sturgill According to the most recent statistics, nearly 300,000 U. S. students now study abroad, while close to one million students from other nations are studying abroad in the U. S. In an upcoming Center for Engaged Learning…

Key Terms in Writing Transfer Research

Students Can Transfer Knowledge – Additional Resources

This week’s Chronicle of Higher Education includes Dan Berrett’s story, “Students Can Transfer Knowledge if Taught How” (subscription required), which features research from participants in the Center’s 2011-2013 Elon Research Seminar on Critical Transitions: Writing and the Question of Transfer. To learn…

Writing-Intensive Courses and Insights from Writing Transfer Research

George Kuh (2008) identifies Writing-Intensive Courses as a high-impact educational practice – a practice that facilitates both student retention and engagement. The Association of American Colleges and Universities describes Writing-Intensive Courses as “emphasiz[ing] writing at all levels of instruction and across the curriculum, including final-year projects. Students are encouraged to produce and revise various forms of writing for different audiences in different disciplines.”
Yet what do higher education stakeholders know about supporting student writing across the curriculum? How can universities best prepare students to write “for different audiences in different disciplines”? How can general education courses equip students with knowledge and strategies for writing in their majors and beyond? Writing transfer research tackles these questions.

Understanding how students change in higher education

by Peter Felten This post is adapted from C. Johansson and P. Felten, Transforming Students: Fulfilling the Promise of Higher Education (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014), pages 5 and 13-15. Transformative learning has been the subject of considerable scholarship over…

Crowdsourcing Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Sharing Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) projects online is not a new concept. The University of Kansas Center for Teaching Excellence has a well established portfolio gallery and the Elon Teaching and Learning Partnership highlights SoTL projects by secondary and post-secondary school faculty – just two examples of SoTL online. Yet what would it look like if the SoTL community embraced online tools to disseminate research more quickly and more broadly, while also facilitating peer review of projects?