Key Terms in Writing Transfer Research

Students Can Transfer Knowledge – Additional Resources

This week’s Chronicle of Higher Education includes Dan Berrett’s story, “Students Can Transfer Knowledge if Taught How” (subscription required), which features research from participants in the Center’s 2011-2013 Elon Research Seminar on Critical Transitions: Writing and the Question of Transfer. To learn…

Crowdsourcing Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Sharing Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) projects online is not a new concept. The University of Kansas Center for Teaching Excellence has a well established portfolio gallery and the Elon Teaching and Learning Partnership highlights SoTL projects by secondary and post-secondary school faculty – just two examples of SoTL online. Yet what would it look like if the SoTL community embraced online tools to disseminate research more quickly and more broadly, while also facilitating peer review of projects?

Lee Shulman on the Potential of Aggregated SoTL Data

Imagine an online resource that cataloged Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) studies from across global contexts. Now imagine if you could search that archival site to find not only the key findings of studies but also rich contextual information about where each was conducted. If you could, through one online tool, aggregate all the SoTL studies conducted in educational contexts like yours, how might you use the data? How might the aggregated results inform your future scholarship? Your research-informed practices?

What type of evidence are we using in evidence-based teaching?

From college-to-career readiness discussions to  professional networks to publications on teaching, higher education stakeholders are witnessing steadily increasing calls for evidence-based teaching. Yet what do policy makers, administrators, and faculty/academic staff mean by “evidence-based”? Lee Shulman suggests that our understanding of…

Sparking a Cultural Shift in Higher Education

Questions about the value of higher education and governmental focus on its costs continue to filter into discussions about colleges and universities. From Our Underachieving Colleges (Derek Bok, 2006) to Academically Adrift (Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa, 2011) to news stories around the globe, higher education’s status quo is being called into question… Fortunately, a growing number of scholars are recognizing the potential of the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) to change campus cultures about student learning.

Going Public with Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

One of the key characteristics of scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) is publicly sharing “both the process and the products of inquiry” (Felten, 2013). While faculty develop writing strategies for their disciplinary scholarship as they advance through their degree programs and careers, SoTL writing requires faculty to learn how to write about classroom practice, pedagogies, and evidence of student learning – often unfamiliar writing realms. For many faculty, their early efforts at this type of writing invoke challenges regarding genre, voice, and expertise (Cambridge, 2004). What, then, can universities do to support faculty embarking on SoTL writing projects, and how can faculty position themselves to make this transition successfully?

Changing Higher Education One Step at a Time

Scholarship of teaching and learning can have an effect on multiple levels. While SoTL can be a source of ideas and part of an individual scholarly agenda, it also has the potential to foster change on larger levels. One person’s research can inspire a whole department to try new ways of working with students. One department’s work can serve as a template for colleagues across campus. A cluster of SoTL scholars in a single field can lead the way to transformation of teaching within a discipline. And all of that work, on all of those levels, yields insights about teaching and learning that should be part of regional, national, and international discussions about higher education policy. SoTL scholars can become public intellectuals, and together we can advocate for the importance of faculty and student voices in decision-making about the future of higher education.

Classroom Ecology, the New Voc-Ed, and Academic Writing at the Edge

What happens when you ask three scholars to explore learning spaces from their unique individual and institutional perspectives? Audience members are challenged to reconsider their understandings of physical, program-level, and online learning spaces, along with their expectations for conference plenaries. The Friday, October 4, 2013, Plenary at ISSOTL 2013 featured TED-style talks by Thomas Horejes (Gallaudet University), anthony lising antonio (Stanford University), and Siân Bayne (University of Edinburgh). More information about the speakers and their talks is provided below the video.