Part 2: Embracing the Potential of Writing about Learning and Teaching

Introduction to Part 2

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Part 2 explains three ways of understanding the potential of writing about learning and teaching: as a means of creating and contributing to conversations with fellow learning and teaching scholars; as a values-based approach to drawing on and shaping scholarly identities through dialogue; and as an opportunity for ongoing learning.

Discussion Questions

  1. With which learning and teaching communities do you want to be in dialogue?
  2. How do you see yourself as a writer? How do other people see you as a writer?
  3. What matters to you about writing?
  4. How are you learning as you write?

Chapter 3: Creating and Contributing to Scholarly Conversations through Writing

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Chapter 3 unpacks the metaphor of writing as creating and contributing to conversations, and it emphasizes the multitude of communities that have different conversations about learning and teaching.

Discussion Questions

  1. How do your personal, cultural, and institutional identities inform the choices you might make about creating and communicating within a scholarly community?
  2. What are the taken-for-granted writing norms in your discipline? How does writing about your learning and teaching allow you to communicate through writing in new ways?
  3. Who are the scholars you want to be in dialogue with?
  4. What is the cultural context for your learning and teaching? How does that context influence the scholarly conversation you are in, seek to contribute to, or hope to create?

Chapter 4: Fostering Identity through a Values-based Approach to Writing

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Chapter 4 explores the ways in which writing is a relational communication process that is informed by and shapes our identities and values as writers and scholars in learning and teaching in higher education.

Discussion Questions

  1. How do you see yourself as a writer, and how do you want others to see you as a writer?
  2. What matters to you about writing?
  3. Which of these priorities relate to discipline-specific work and might be a benefit or a barrier to writing in a different field?
  4. What does dialogue with differently positioned people reveal to you about your identities? In what ways have you used or could you use writing to develop your identities and support the development of others’ identities?

Chapter 5: Conceptualizing Writing as a Learning Process

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Chapter 5 focuses on writing as a learning process—a way of learning about scholarly conversations you might want to create or contribute to, about yourself and your values, and about what you already know and understand about learning and teaching and what you do not yet know or understand.

Discussion Questions

  1. What do you want to learn more about regarding learning and teaching in higher education, and how can you use writing to explore that?
  2. What insights that you generate for yourself through writing might be usefully shared with a wider audience?
  3. How can you imagine using writing to clarify your understandings of ongoing and potential scholarly conversations about learning and teaching, your own identities and possible roles in those conversations, and your values as a writer?